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Blend of the Month - Balance
Blend of the Month - Balance
Blend of the Month - Balance
Blend of the Month - Balance

Blend of the Month - Balance

Regular price £7.00 Sale

Sourced from:
Rwanda - Bushoki / Guatemala - La Bolsa

Tastes like:
Floral / cherry / plum / honey

Suitable for:

All brew methods, but we really quite like it in a V60, Chemex or Aeropress

Roast:
Medium

More Info:

Each month (funnily enough) we introduce a new Blend of the Month. To be quite frank, this is probably one of our most favourite things to do (bar eating pizza, but that's pretty normal right?)

We carefully sourced two or more beans that caressingly (it's a word) compliment each other. Expect some fun flavours here that work brilliantly with most brew methods. 

 

Even More Info from our supplier:

Location: Rwanda - Bushoki

Rwanda is blessed with ideal coffee growing conditions that include high altitude, regular rainfall, volcanic soils with good organic structure and an abundance of Bourbon. The vast majority of Rwandan coffee is produced by smallholders of which there are thought to be around half a million with parcels of land often not much larger than just one hectare per family. Coffee is grown in most parts of the country, with particularly large concentrations along Lake Kivu and in the southern province. Rwandan smallholders organise themselves into cooperatives and share the services of centralised wet-mills –or washing stations as they are known locally. Flowering takes place between September and October and the harvest runs from March to July with shipments starting in late May early June.

The station was initially built in 2006 by the Iyongera Musaruro Co-operative who began working with Falcon's sister company RTC in 2014, to help with financial management and production oversight to improve all aspects of the station. The co-op has approximately 500 members and receives cherry from 800 farmers in total from the surrounding area.

During the harvest process, cherry is delivered to the station where it is pulped using a 3 disc Mckinnon pulper before undergoing fermentation in tanks for 12 - 18 hours. After this, the coffee is density sorted in the water grading channels before being dried on one of the 42 raised African beds.

Guatemala - La Bolsa

Finca La Bolsa was bought by Jorge Vides, a distinguished medical professional, in 1958. Prior to this the land wasn’t used for coffee production. Jorge won a number of awards for coffee production and for services to the region of Huehuetenango, and had the main hospital in the coffee growing community named after him. La Bolsa competed in the 2002 Cup Of Excellence competition and placed second, scoring 94.98. La Bolsa sits between two mountains, which provide a very stable, humid microclimate. This combined with the limestone rich soils give the coffee a very unique profile, with a rich syrupy body and plenty of malic and citric acidity. Coffee is fermented for between 18 and 24 hours, and is then cleaned of mucilage, graded in channels and soaked overnight.

La Bolsa is RFA certified & follows C.A.F.E practices guidelines. Coffee Care funded the construction of a school and nursery at the farm, with fully trained, full time teachers. All of the temporary and permanent staff have access to schooling for their children, and they are incentivised to leave their children at school or nursery through food donations. When a child attends school or nursery for 5 consecutive days they receive a weekly supply of rice, beans and corn. Prior to this food ration scheme it was very difficult to get people to leave their children in the care of others, and schooling wasn’t necessarily valued as there is a greater pressure on earning more money to feed the family. As a result there are no children working in the farm, and the school and nursery classes are full. Accommodation is provided for permanent and temporary workers, with separate facilities for men and women and families, bathrooms and kitchens. Sections of the farm are reserved areas, to promote biodiversity, reduce exposure to winds and soil erosion. Inga trees are used as a shade trees, and to fix nitrogen in the soil which is essential for plant and cherry growth. Renardo has an expansive composting operation to make use of waste products, using redworms.